Monday, August 18, 2014

BLUTO'S FAMOUS LAUGH

I spliced this together myself...

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

MY MUSIC

I HEARD-HUGO WINTERHALTER

Different from Don Redman's classic version, this one is just as infectious, given a unique sound by Hugo Winterhalter's double-sized Dixieland group.



SINGING A HAPPY SONG-ENRIC MADUIGUERA

Peppy, catchy instrumental that rather reminds me of a backup to Popeye's antics. A 1950s reissue LP of earlier 'high tone' dance orchestras.

COMING AT MIDNITE...

Wednesday, August 13th on cartoonresearch.com: My article, SUPERKATT: HIS STORY!



RESEARCH!



 
 

Sunday, August 10, 2014

THREE TERRYTOONS

I posted these the other day on YouTube:

1950 was possibly the high point of loopy Terrytoons animation. This one puts a novel twist on the Tom & Jerry “kill the romance” plot. Very overstated, wild animation by all.

This rare later Gandy has him as “the new sheriff”. Many gags are pale echoes of Bugs Bunny/Yosemite Sam encounters, but the crazy animation and satisfying climax may make it worth your while.

I don't hang on to many things I loved as a child, but this is forever. The virtues of Jim Tyer's shootout need not be stated, and I was especially wowed by the bizarre surprise in Carlo Vinci's "gun matching" scene.
As a kid, before home videos, I had to keep memories of this one in my head through the school day so I could attempt to reproduce the "feel" in still drawings at home. Animation like this is not just made up of "funny" and "cool" drawings; it has to be expertly timed to "read" at all. They all knew their stuff (not just the "stars" of the studio).

Enjoy, Milt!

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

COMICS ARE NO FUN

I hope my FB friend, Al, won't mind, but I am quoting myself from a little "talk" we had today:

I like joy, anger, and physical, human feeling in art. In comics, I see that diminished by Spiegelman & Fantagraphics' influence, and am angry about it.

I'm reading some early Tezuka now, and THAT is work I like. Unafraid of being earnest to the point of "uncool".

It's my first time reading his comics at length. They have a sense of fancy and sincerity discouraged in current fare.

I mean, I'm tired of hipsters desolate over their coffee mugs, "above it all".


COPYRIGHT 2014 BY MILTON KNIGHT

Sunday, July 13, 2014

LATEST EDITION.

Regarding CLR James: Ye editor says not to lose heart, the book will be published. I dam sure hope so!

Below, another sequence from my CLR James 'graphic novel' (comic, dammit!). James at age 8 in Trinidad.






Yrs, MK

COPYRIGHT 2014 BY MILTON KNIGHT
FOILED AGAIN

The project I’ve been working on since Fall last year is less than likely to see print. The history of CLR James, 20th century Trinidadian social activist, is not a subject I would have chosen myself. It was presented to me by an editor who said it had a publisher and that it was a “done deal”. It wasn’t, and once the months of (paid) labor were presented, the publisher passed on it. They have committed themselves to too many ‘graphic novel’ projects as it is. (I have my doubts about the legitimacy of the “graphic novel revolution’, but will go into that another time.)

Since the humor element of comics has been supplanted by strivings for Art and Education (‘humor’, ‘comics’, how’s that for irony?), I hoped that this book might break one or two glass ceilings for me, and also hoped that the book would serve a more noble purpose: to use a cartoon style to present images of blacks in new, constructive, even heroic roles. I wanted to make a book that would make kids’ eyes pop and would inspire wonder and interest to those of all ages, especially those who normally avoid the majority of stodgy graphic textbooks. A sort of ‘learning by accident’.

Since, as I said, the book is less than likely to see print, I feel less beholden to keep it a secret. Here’s a sequence summarizing CLR James’ play, TOUSSAINT L’OVERTURE, about the former slave who led his fellow Haitians to freedom. Paul Robeson created the leading role, and it is he who plays it here. (Note: Haiti was under French rule at the time, 1791, and renamed San Domingo. The blacks had been officially freed, but the conditions of life remained the same.)
 















 
 
Yrs, MK
 
COPYRIGHT 2014 BY MILTON KNIGHT